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RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene. The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

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    监制:Diana Wan


    RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene.

    The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

    Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.

    The Works is aired on RTHK 31 & 31A every Wednesday at 17:30, and a repeat every Thursday at 06:30 & Saturday at 18:30.

    Archive available later after broadcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.



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    12/12/2018

    Later in the show, multiple award- winning cellist István Várdai is here with us, and he’s brought with him a very special instrument: a 1673 Stradivari cello previously owned by the late great British cellist, Jacqueline du Pré. But before listening to that 345-year-old Stradivari, we’re going to hear a form of folk music from Taiwan that also has a long history. There’s a wide variety of music in Taiwan that ranges from the polyphonic vocals of the island’s indigenous tribes to Western style classics and contemporary pop. Over the centuries, many Chinese migrated to the island. Among their own musical forms, they created Taiwanese opera, also known as Hokkien Opera, particularly popular with the Hakka people. And then, on a somewhat more modest scale, there’s the art of the traditional Taiwanese narrative song “Liām Kua”, usually played by a single performer.

    Hungarian cellist István Várdai has been awarded Gold Medals at both the International Cello Competition in Geneva and the ARD Competition in Munich. He studied at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest and in Vienna. Since then, at 33, he has appeared internationally with many impressive orchestras and conductors.
    He plays a 1673 Stradivari cello, one of fewer than 65 in existence from the legendary instrument-maker, and one that was once owned by one of the most celebrated 20th century cellists, the late Jacqueline du Pré. Várdai says he feels the instrument was “made for eternity” and that it helped him to find his voice as a musician. He’s here to tell us more.

    重温

    CATCHUP
    10 - 12
    2018
    RTHK 31
    • Traditional Taiwanese narrative song “Liām Kua” singer, Yang Xiu-qing & in the studio: cellist István Várdai

      Traditional Taiwanese narrative song “Liām Kua” singer, Yang Xiu-qing & in the studio: cellist István Várdai

      Later in the show, multiple award- winning cellist István Várdai is here with us, and he’s brought with him a very special instrument: a 1673 Stradivari cello previously owned by the late great British cellist, Jacqueline du Pré. But before listening to that 345-year-old Stradivari, we’re going to hear a form of folk music from Taiwan that also has a long history. There’s a wide variety of music in Taiwan that ranges from the polyphonic vocals of the island’s indigenous tribes to Western style classics and contemporary pop. Over the centuries, many Chinese migrated to the island. Among their own musical forms, they created Taiwanese opera, also known as Hokkien Opera, particularly popular with the Hakka people. And then, on a somewhat more modest scale, there’s the art of the traditional Taiwanese narrative song “Liām Kua”, usually played by a single performer.

      Hungarian cellist István Várdai has been awarded Gold Medals at both the International Cello Competition in Geneva and the ARD Competition in Munich. He studied at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest and in Vienna. Since then, at 33, he has appeared internationally with many impressive orchestras and conductors.
      He plays a 1673 Stradivari cello, one of fewer than 65 in existence from the legendary instrument-maker, and one that was once owned by one of the most celebrated 20th century cellists, the late Jacqueline du Pré. Várdai says he feels the instrument was “made for eternity” and that it helped him to find his voice as a musician. He’s here to tell us more.

      12/12/2018
    • Ten Years Int'l Project & in the studio: percussionist Matthew Lau & Bevis Ng

      Ten Years Int'l Project & in the studio: percussionist Matthew Lau & Bevis Ng

      The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

      Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.

      05/12/2018
    • Wood art, HK Int'l Photography Festival & in the studio: singer-songwriter Emmy the Great

      Wood art, HK Int'l Photography Festival & in the studio: singer-songwriter Emmy the Great

      We look at wood, a material that’s relatively common in Hong Kong’s less built up areas, but one that we often fail to use to the best of its advantage. As Typhoon Mangkhut battered Hong Kong in September, it uprooted more than 60,000 trees. Some 7,000 tonnes of tree debris ended up in our landfills, but a few artists have decided to rescue at least a little of this material and turn it into art.

      The Hong Kong International Photography Festival was set up eight years ago by 19 local photographers. Since then it’s grown bigger and spread to more venues. This year the festival focuses on Japanese photography. One of the major exhibitions in the festival showcases 50 years of iconic black and white pictures from the well-known photography magazine “Provoke”, founded in 1968. Another major exhibition is the first local solo exhibition of works by the late photographer Nakahira Takuma. The festival also features a satellite exhibition of 20 artists’ works, as well as talks, screenings and workshops.

      As a singer, Emma Lee Moss is better known as Emmy the Great. Born in Hong Kong to a British father and a Chinese mother, she moved to England when she was 12.
      She’s since spent time in New York and Los Angeles among other places to pursue her music career. The songs on her first two albums, “First Love” and “Virtue”, focus on her own experiences. “Virtue” details her pain and confusion when a formerly atheist fiancé found religion and decided to break off their relationship. Her third album “Second Love” examines the interaction between our digital age and human emotions. Emily the Great is now back in Hong Kong, and she’s here to tell us more.

      28/11/2018
    • Underwater orchestra,

      Underwater orchestra, "AquaSonic", artists Wong Tong & Fong Chung-Ray, studio performance: pianist Luca Sestak

      Later in the show, we look at two artists who take decidedly experimental approaches to their art: the Taiwanese abstract painter Fong Chung-Ray and German pianist Luca Sestak. First though, we’re beginning with a Danish music group, “Between Music” whose desire to experiment takes them to unusual depths. And very wet ones. As they’ve discovered, even singing takes on new challenges when you are doing it underwater. And many of the instruments on which the group plays have had to be custom made, including the underwater organ, the crystallophone, the rotacorda and an adapted violin.

      While we’re on the subject of unique musical instruments, Hong Kong artist Wong Tong not only paints, but also makes his own instruments, including tongue drums and ukuleles. At Sin Sin Fine Art until the end of this month, the exhibition “Hidden Gaze” includes paintings, installations, and musical instruments, inspired – he says – by the To Kwa Wan community in which he works.

      Painter Fong Chung-Ray was a leading member of the Fifth Moon Group, a group of artists at the forefront of the modern art movement in Taiwan in the 1960s.
      Over the past six decades, Fong has not only experimented with ink and abstract expressionism, he has also developed a technique of applying acrylic onto plastic sheets to transfer images to paper. On show at Galerie du Monde until this Saturday in the exhibition “Enlightenment: 1998-2018” are 15 works made over the past twenty years, some of which have never before been seen in public.

      23-year old pianist Luca Sestak likes to explore new territories with the piano. He says he prefers blues, boogie woogie and jazz to the classical repertoire. He also composes his own music. His YouTube videos of his energetic and fast performances, and his re-arrangements of popular songs, have attracted millions of views. Last month, he visited Hong Kong for a concert, and he came to our studio to talk to Billy Lee.

      21/11/2018
    • Art & Freedom of Speech: interview with writer Ma Jian & Pussy Riot, in the studio: Eugene Pao & Trey Lee

      Art & Freedom of Speech: interview with writer Ma Jian & Pussy Riot, in the studio: Eugene Pao & Trey Lee

      The freedom to say or express what you think is important to most of us. Perhaps to few more so than artists. It’s hard to imagine a thriving art scene without it.
      A number of events in the past few weeks have left many worrying about how much the space for free speech in Hong Kong is narrowing. In October, the government refused a work visa to Financial Times Asia news editor Victor Mallet. The decision is widely seen as retribution for chairing and defending a talk by Hong Kong National Party convener Andy Chan at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club. The political group had not been banned at the time. Last Thursday, Mr Mallet tried to enter Hong Kong again, this time as a visitor, and was refused entry after several hours of questioning. The day before, Chinese dissident and exiled writer Ma Jian had said on Twitter that the Tai Kwun arts centre was refusing permission for him to give two talks organised by the Hong Kong International Literary Festival on its premises. The arts centre later changed its mind. Mr Mallet’s off to an assignment in Europe, but he did say on social media that one of the things he’ll do in the days ahead is re-read George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. Or he could even read Ma Jian’s new novel, “China Dream” which is itself set in a somewhat Orwellian world.

      Now in its sixth year, the four-day Musicus Festival starts this Thursday. This year, it’s highlighting Nordic music, including folk tunes and pieces on the nyckelharpa, a traditional Swedish folk instrument. There’ll also be children’s concerts, classical music, and jazz. The guest performers come from as far afield as Romania, Germany, Italy, South Korea and Taiwan. The festival’s Artistic Director Trey Lee is here with guitarist Eugene Pao to tell us more.

      14/11/2018
    • Tribute to Louis Cha: wuxia novels and their translations, Michael Hulls' Lightspace & studio performance: NOVA Ensemble

      Tribute to Louis Cha: wuxia novels and their translations, Michael Hulls' Lightspace & studio performance: NOVA Ensemble

      The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

      Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.

      07/11/2018
    • National Palace Museum Taiwan & City U's

      National Palace Museum Taiwan & City U's "Animal", Xu Beihong & studio performance: harmonica player Cy Leo

      A look at an interactive exhibition that deals with the constantly-changing relationship between man and animals. Since 2014, the City University of Hong Kong has been collaborating with the National Palace Museum in Taiwan on a series of exhibitions. In “Animal – Art Science Nature Society”, the third such exhibition, the museum and City University’s bring together pieces from a number of disciplines, both scientific and artistic.

      A few weeks ago, we looked at the works of artist Pan Yuliang, one of the first female Chinese artists to go to study art abroad. That group of early pioneers, of course, also included several men, one of whom was Xu Beihong. Xu Beihong is known for his Chinese ink-and-wash paintings of horses and birds. Like many of that first generation of artists to study in Europe, he broke new ground in the techniques and styles he adopted to reflect a modernising China. At the Sun Museum until early December, “Xu Beihong and His Times” features 61 artworks by 33 artists.

      Harmonica player CY Leo, also known as Cy, comes from a family of harmonica lovers and champions of the instrument. His father is a founding member of the King’s Harmonica Quintet and the founder of the Hong Kong Harmonica Association. At different times, Cy, his father and his younger brother have all been crowned world champions of the instrument. His repertoire includes classical works, jazz, and other styles and arrangements. He’s here to tell us more about his latest passion project.

      31/10/2018
    • Chinese Documentary Festival 2018, Oscar Murillo & in the studio: pianist Stephen Hough

      Chinese Documentary Festival 2018, Oscar Murillo & in the studio: pianist Stephen Hough

      This year’s Chinese Documentary Festival, now in its 11th edition, lasts more than a month and showcases 12 Chinese and non-Chinese feature films and shorts. This year it also includes a special section on the issues of the so-called “comfort women” and on Palestine.

      Oscar Murillo is a Colombian painter and installation artist. He works in a wide variety of media, using text, recycled materials, and other items he has collected, to create his works on canvas and paper, and to produce sculptures, installations, live events, collaborative projects and videos. Until the middle of November, the David Zwirner gallery is presenting, under the title ““the build up of content and information”, his first solo exhibition in Asia. It includes both paintings and works on paper.

      The Economist named him one of 20 “living polymaths”. Pianist Stephen Hough is a leading concert pianist, composer, educator, writer of essays and fiction, and painter. He has recorded more than 50 albums, many of which have received Grammy nominations and eight Gramophone Magazine Awards. He is globally acclaimed for his interpretations of the piano repertoire. Two weeks ago, he was in Hong Kong for a one-night recital of pieces by Debussy, Schumann and Beethoven. He also came to The Works studio the day after his concert.

      24/10/2018
    • Photographer Chang Chao-tang, Sparkle@Oi! & in the studio: Nowhere Boys

      Photographer Chang Chao-tang, Sparkle@Oi! & in the studio: Nowhere Boys

      The annual Taiwan Culture Festival started last Thursday. The month-long programme includes operas, film screenings and exhibitions. Taiwanese photographer, Chang Chao Tang’s career spans more than five decades. Apart from his still photography, he has worked in television, documentaries, and feature films. On show until the end of this month, “A Journey of Nostalgia” showcases his love for nature and reveals why nostalgia keeps him going.

      Artist and landscape architect Sara Wong makes use of architectural, time-based and sculptural forms to explore urban movement and social engagement. Most recently she has curated “Sparkle! Journal of a City Foot Soldier”, inspired by the writer Paul Auster’s “City of Glass”. For this exhibition, at an artspace in Oil Street, she has invited several artists to present a series of approaches to, and perspectives on, cities and modern urban living.

      Formed in 2015, the five-member band, Nowhere Boys plays what they called “cinematic rock”. Their inspiration ranges from thrillers such as “The Butterfly Effect”, to Japanese animation films like Miyazaki’s “Castle in the Sky”. They wrote their own songs and recorded their debut EP in their homes with their own equipment. It was so successful that the first 1,000 copies they’d made sold out in three months. Now signed to a big label, the band still maintains that indie spirit and its members say they continue to go their own way musically. They are here to tell us more.

      17/10/2018
    • Anton Fung & Wong Chun's Project Keep Pushing, Drifting Borders & in the studio: flautist Angus Lee

      Anton Fung & Wong Chun's Project Keep Pushing, Drifting Borders & in the studio: flautist Angus Lee

      We’re beginning today’s show with percussion, and more specifically, drums. Anton Fung has played as a session drummer with many in the Cantopop scene. He’s also a member of the indie band, tfvsjs. Recently, Anton and film director Wong Chun collaborated to share their passion for the drums. They’ve invited several different directors to create a series of films that bring together the arts of percussion and cinematography.

      Not only did the 2008 financial crisis send many countries into an economic tailspin, it also had major effects on the social and political scenes. Austerity, combined with the arrival of political refugees from nations in conflict, has created considerable resentment in many countries, and that has led to a rise in right wing populism and nationalism. The art project “Drifting Borders” is under way now and will continue up to October 21st It incorporates films, performance art and forum discussions that examine such issues as national borders, social identity, belonging, loss of cultural roots, individuality, and nationalism.

      Like the tenor Jasper Sung, who appeared on The Works last week, flautist Angus Lee graduated from the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts. Angus, who also studied at Britain’s Royal Academy of Music, doesn’t only perform the classical flute repertoire, he’s also a self-taught composer. This Sunday as part of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department’s “Our Music Talents” series, he’s performing a programme that ranges from Richard Strauss to Mantovani, and even includes a composition of his own.

      10/10/2018
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