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    监制:Chan Choi-ha

    10/09/2020

    Let us mix alcohol with familiar smells and seize our exclusive memory.

    Kit and Joseph created a local craft gin capturing various scents representing Hong Kong in it. Scents like the floral scent of white jade orchid, the scent of tangerine from dried tangerine peels and scent of sandalwood in temples, more or less exist in our memories. They have performed numerous experiments to extract the best white jade orchid floral water for gin making, in the hope of combining local culture and crops and creating a distilled spirits of collective memory.

    Kerry, a native of Xinhui, has a vivid memory of dried tangerine peels. Since she was small, she helped to pick and peel tangerines and dry the peels under the sun in a tangerine orchard in the country. When her two sons were born, Kerry made some dried tangerine peels with red skin tangerines of the year as a gift to her sons. She hopes that when her sons grow up, they will remember her whenever they taste dried tangerine peels.

    In the past, there were quite a lot of distilleries in Hong Kong. People loved to drink double distilled rice wine after a day of hard work. Jack, the owner of Kwu Tung Distillery, will share with us the history of some vanished distilleries and the origin of Yuk Ping Shu.


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    EPISODES
    • The Scent of My Memory

      The Scent of My Memory

      Let us mix alcohol with familiar smells and seize our exclusive memory.

      Kit and Joseph created a local craft gin capturing various scents representing Hong Kong in it. Scents like the floral scent of white jade orchid, the scent of tangerine from dried tangerine peels and scent of sandalwood in temples, more or less exist in our memories. They have performed numerous experiments to extract the best white jade orchid floral water for gin making, in the hope of combining local culture and crops and creating a distilled spirits of collective memory.

      Kerry, a native of Xinhui, has a vivid memory of dried tangerine peels. Since she was small, she helped to pick and peel tangerines and dry the peels under the sun in a tangerine orchard in the country. When her two sons were born, Kerry made some dried tangerine peels with red skin tangerines of the year as a gift to her sons. She hopes that when her sons grow up, they will remember her whenever they taste dried tangerine peels.

      In the past, there were quite a lot of distilleries in Hong Kong. People loved to drink double distilled rice wine after a day of hard work. Jack, the owner of Kwu Tung Distillery, will share with us the history of some vanished distilleries and the origin of Yuk Ping Shu.

      10/09/2020
    • A Wish Fulfilled

      A Wish Fulfilled

      A bowl of ordinary cart noodles is not only an inheritance of craftsmanship. It also a dream come true for Chris’ parents.

      Cart noodles were first sold from push carts by illegal itinerant cooked food hawkers years ago, and the grassroots were their target customers. The choices of toppings were limited and the ingredients used were all of poor quality. As the society advanced, cart noodles have become a trendy food item nowadays, with the types of toppings greatly increased and the quality of ingredients vastly improved.

      Chris’s parents lived in the old Sau Mau Ping Estate during 1970’s. They sold cart noodles to support their family of six. In the early 1990’s, the old Estate was demolished in phase for rebuild. As a result, Chris’s parents had no choice but to terminate their business. Since they could not afford to rent a shop, their wish to reopen the cart noodle business was put aside for more than two decades.

      Two years ago, as Chris’s mother fell ill, Chris resigned from her job and took care of her mother. Last year, she opened a cart noodle shop to fulfil her parents’ dream.

      03/09/2020
    • My Journey with Red Bean Soup

      My Journey with Red Bean Soup

      Probably no one can be sure who invented sweet soups, but most people know what sweet soups taste like.

      “Sweet soup” is a dessert and hence sweet in taste. Red bean soup is one of the most frequently consumed sweet soup.

      Hong Kong people generally have the habit of having “sweet soups”. In the past, people would have red bean sweet soup, green bean sweet soup, black sesame sweet soup, etc., in congee restaurants. Sweet soup is also the last dish of banquets in Chinese restaurants. Subsequently, sweet soup shops have mushroomed with many different kinds of sweet soups available. And sweet soups have even become the protagonist on the table.

      After her divorce, in addition to taking care of both her singing career and her son, singer Colleen LAU recently opened a sweet soup shop. She often likes to study different kinds of sweet soups and desserts. Taking on multiple roles, her dream is to work hard for her family every day.

      Colleen likes to have sweet soups, and she makes sweet soups for herself and her son when she has time. Occasionally, she shares them with her neighbours, winning a lot of friendship. One day, when she was hanging out on the streets and trying to find something to eat, she found out that the streets were full of “tapioca bubble tea” shops. She then asked herself: Are there any Hong Kong-style drink similar to this one? How about our culinary culture?

      As such, she is determined to develop “portable” sweet soups. In May this year, she took the first step towards her dream – she opened a sweet soup shop, running a pilot scheme of selling “portable” sweet soups.

      27/08/2020
    • Russian Red - Borscht

      Russian Red - Borscht

      Borscht, the classic Russian soup, marks the transformation of the Hong Kong-style western cuisine. Under different roles, it has been accompanying Hong Kong people to grow from the 40’s to the present.

      Yvonne’s grandfather was the owner of a very famous Russian-style western restaurant in the 40’s / 50’s. The borscht in his menu is a collective memory of many people. The once very popular restaurant closed down in the 70’s, but grandpa’s hard working character and the fact that he led a frugal life have been inspiring her, and supporting her to preserve the “taste of home”.

      The decline of the high-class Russian-style western cuisine marked the rise of the Hong Kong-style western cuisine. Borscht was however retained and has become Hong Kongers’ “Red Soup”. This restaurant, with its original decoration retained, has been located in To Kwa Wan for 40 years. It has all along been preparing Borscht by a classic recipe. After experiencing the sweet and sour taste of borscht, YU Yan-shing decided to stay in his last fortress.

      Raymond and his wife have inherited their parent’s secret recipes and added on their own creative ideas. They run their small restaurant in an alley and use Borscht as the soup base to make noodles and rice noodles. It’s a classic example showcasing the spirit of Hong Kong people - learning foreign things and making improvements to them.

      20/08/2020
    • The Wonton Noodle Dream

      The Wonton Noodle Dream

      Wonton noodles took root in Hong Kong after being cultivated from Guangzhou and is subsequently developed into shrimp wonton noodles, becoming a local signature dish that almost everyone in Hong Kong has tasted it. Being full of memories of different people, wonton noodles also has witnessed changes of Hong Kong society as it was first served by street hawkers, later in food stalls, then in noodle shops today.

      Nowadays, wonton noodles of various noodle shops look similar but taste differently. For example, one in Yuen Long sticks with his grandfather’s recipe in 1940’s to inherit the fruit of the older generation. Meanwhile, there is someone trying to find the taste of wonton noodles served by his grandfather back then. Sparing no effort to reproduce the taste of childhood, he has not only grilled flatfish for the soup base by himself, also studied the notes left by his grandfather to make bamboo pole noodles which is disappearing and replaced by machine-made noodles.

      Though traditional tastes can link people with the past, there are also people who want to enrich the food culture with a distinctive taste that shrimps are replaced by tunas which are caught in a sustainable way, to attract younger generations.

      Producer: Yuen Kit-ling

      13/08/2020
    • A Field of Lotus in my Heart

      A Field of Lotus in my Heart

      Hong Kong might be the place where you can find the most types of mooncakes. There will be new types of mooncakes launched every year. We will not find it bewildering to see ice cream, durian or even fried chicken being put into mooncakes. No matter what forms the mooncakes are in, they will always contain the unique emotions different people have towards the Mid-Autumn Festival.

      Among the wetlands in Long Valley in Sheung Shui, there is a piece of farmland growing lotus seeds. Through the work on agricultural land rehabilitation, KAN Wai-hong conserves the ecology of the wetlands and supplies fresh lotus seeds to social enterprises for making 100% locally made lotus seed mooncakes.

      06/08/2020
    • Hong Burger

      Hong Burger

      Hong Kong is a metropolis with rich cultural vibrancy. A lot of Western food can be found in Hong Kong, and hamburger is one of them. However, since the food ingredients found in Hong Kong and the taste of Hong Kong people differ from those of the West, we have developed various local delicacies of Hong Kong.

      71-year-old CHUNG Kei-ching is the owner of a fast food eatery. During 1960’s, his father CHUNG Kwun-kau was taught by his friend and created the Hong Kong style-burger, which was named the “Hong Kong-style Bun” and sold near the Hung Hom Ferry Pier. The Bun was sold in Hong Kong even before the famous American burger chain entering the local market. For more than 50 years, the CHUNGs had operated their fast food joint in Hung Hom, witnessing the changes in the neighbourhood. They had also built a family-like relationship with the residents of the area. Even though having operated for years, the eatery still could not escape the fate of shutting down in 2017 due to urban renewal. One year later, CHUNG Kei-ching found another location in Hung Hom for re-opening. And therefore, the delightful flavour of the burger which belongs to Hong Kong can be preserved.

      30/07/2020
    • The Evolution of Egg Waffles

      The Evolution of Egg Waffles

      When talking about classic local snacks in Hong Kong, would you choose eggette (egg waffle) as your favourite?

      As a traditional snack in Hong Kong, eggette experienced various changes in the past few decades, showing its flexibility just like Hong Kong people. In recent years, it even moved beyond Hong Kong and became a new international favourite.

      LAI Chiu-hung’s father sold charcoal-grilled eggettes on the street as early as 1960’s to 1970’s. This childhood memory stayed within LAI Chiu-hung, inspiring him to follow his father’s footsteps after he lost his job and takes pride in the eggettes he makes.

      One day, David’s pregnant wife has a craving for eggette at midnight, which sparked off his idea to produce frozen eggettes and to develop a fully automatic eggette machine. Eggette is not just a commodity of his business, but also a connection of his family.

      Michael’s café combines different food ingredients with eggettes to create astonishing combinations. Not only can customers enjoy a choice of more flavours, but the combos can also fulfil Michael’s wish when he studied abroad in his younger days: to go back to Hong Kong and have a sheet of eggettes.

      These three persons each have a different story related to eggettes. Eggette can have countless variations, but its taste in people’s memory remains unchanged.

      23/07/2020
    • My Signature Pot

      My Signature Pot

      A pot of clay-pot rice made a young man who had suffered career setback rebound and start all over again.

      Ray spent his childhood in his family’s Hong Kong-style café. With a lively and active character, Ray decided to leave home upon graduating from high school. After ten years of career ups and downs, he could hardly survive. He had no choice but returned to his family’s café to help out.

      Due to the inflated prices of commodities, the café tea restaurant was not able to make ends meet in recent years and business had been difficult. After his return, Ray tried to find a signature dish that could make a breakthrough, hoping that it could turn the business around. Among a large number of dishes, he chose the more down to earth clay pot rice. Ray had carried out extensive research and hoped that he could find a flavor from a wide variety that could represent himself. During the process, his childhood memories rekindled and he recalled a common ingredient that his grandmother used in the past – golden oyster.

      As his mother’s family used to farm oysters in Lau Fau Shan, Ray is able to obtain the best quality ingredients from an uncle who is still farming oysters there. As such, he decided to use golden oysters as ingredients to produce his own dish – “Golden Oyster Dried Shrimp Clay Pot Rice”.

      This “Golden Oyster Dried Shrimp Clay Pot Rice” became the turning point of Ray's business. Not only has it improved the business of the café, but it also became the matchmaker between Ray and his wife.

      16/07/2020
    • A Skewer Of Memories

      A Skewer Of Memories

      Siu mai is a street snack that every Hong Konger has had before. We may remember it as a delicious hunger fix after school, the snack we look forward the most in a trip to the wet market with our mothers, or the must-have dim sum when we go to a teahouse to yum cha. Siu mai may look ordinary from the outside, but they are an illustration of the essence of the Cantonese cuisine, which is turning humble ingredients into exquisite dishes.

      Hoping to promote the street snacks of Hong Kong, Gigi runs a small shop in Central, where she has earned the support of the neighbourhood with her siu mai and met a right-hand man. Most surprisingly, through the coverage of various media, her story has encouraged more people with mood disorders to get back on their feet.

      Dim sum shop owner Jason says he grew up eating beef. As a child, he went to the teahouse very often with his family and beef siu mai was a must-have. These siu mai are unforgettable childhood memories to him.

      09/07/2020