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监制:Lee Nga Yun


In this programme, activities of urban pathfinders will be carried on so as to find out the history and latent rules of every city through exploring ruins, during which we will approach the murky sides of different eras and study the stories inscribed in every ruin from the perspective of humanistic care.

最新

LATEST
10/12/2019
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In 2016, the three stages of reduction of the Frontier Closed Area (FCA) were completed. At the west of Northern New Territories, the former closed area of Ta Kwu Ling, where indigenous residents live, is now open. This opening and the large-scale construction at Liantang Boundary Control Point are gradually changing the area’s features.

Interestingly, although Lin Ma Hang Village, situated at the northernmost of Hong Kong, is no longer part of the FCA, the only carriage way leading to the Village still is. Without a Closed Road Permit, you have to walk to the village outside FCA’s wire mesh. It poses inconvenience to residents and visitors, but also slows down the pace of development.

As a resident of Lin Ma Hang Village, YIP Yuk-kwan left to work in Germany when he was young, and came back to the Village more than two decades ago. He will tell us about Lin Ma Hang’s history, in addition to visiting Lin Ma Hang Lead Mines, Bridge to the World, and MacIntosh Fort, which all have associations with Lin Ma Hang and FCA.

If you head east from Northern New Territories to Sha Tau Kok, some places there still falls within the FCA. There you can find the northernmost island in the territory, Ap Chau, which is only one kilometre apart from Shenzhen’s Yantian port. Ferries provide the main transportation between Ap Chau and Sha Tau Kok. With the size of only four football pitches, it is currently the home of merely three people. Even though many villagers of Ap Chau moved to the United Kingdom for jobs in the 1960’s, 89-year-old village chief, CHAN Yuen-on, has stayed and guarded the place for religious reasons all along. He even prays and reads religious texts with the villagers every day in the church. Another villager is CHAN’s daughter, Sister Kiu. Now at the age of 70, she only came back two years ago after her mother passed away to take care of her singleton father. Having dwelled in Newcastle, United Kingdom for half a century, returning to live on Ap Chau is indeed not easy for her. Yet, her father’s awe-inspiring dedication to safeguarding the island proves to be a spiritual anchor for herself as well as other villagers.

重温

CATCHUP
11 - 12
2019
RTHK 31
  • So Close, Yet So Far

    So Close, Yet So Far

    In 2016, the three stages of reduction of the Frontier Closed Area (FCA) were completed. At the west of Northern New Territories, the former closed area of Ta Kwu Ling, where indigenous residents live, is now open. This opening and the large-scale construction at Liantang Boundary Control Point are gradually changing the area’s features.

    Interestingly, although Lin Ma Hang Village, situated at the northernmost of Hong Kong, is no longer part of the FCA, the only carriage way leading to the Village still is. Without a Closed Road Permit, you have to walk to the village outside FCA’s wire mesh. It poses inconvenience to residents and visitors, but also slows down the pace of development.

    As a resident of Lin Ma Hang Village, YIP Yuk-kwan left to work in Germany when he was young, and came back to the Village more than two decades ago. He will tell us about Lin Ma Hang’s history, in addition to visiting Lin Ma Hang Lead Mines, Bridge to the World, and MacIntosh Fort, which all have associations with Lin Ma Hang and FCA.

    If you head east from Northern New Territories to Sha Tau Kok, some places there still falls within the FCA. There you can find the northernmost island in the territory, Ap Chau, which is only one kilometre apart from Shenzhen’s Yantian port. Ferries provide the main transportation between Ap Chau and Sha Tau Kok. With the size of only four football pitches, it is currently the home of merely three people. Even though many villagers of Ap Chau moved to the United Kingdom for jobs in the 1960’s, 89-year-old village chief, CHAN Yuen-on, has stayed and guarded the place for religious reasons all along. He even prays and reads religious texts with the villagers every day in the church. Another villager is CHAN’s daughter, Sister Kiu. Now at the age of 70, she only came back two years ago after her mother passed away to take care of her singleton father. Having dwelled in Newcastle, United Kingdom for half a century, returning to live on Ap Chau is indeed not easy for her. Yet, her father’s awe-inspiring dedication to safeguarding the island proves to be a spiritual anchor for herself as well as other villagers.

    10/12/2019
  • Castle

    Castle

    After over two decades since apartheid has been dismantled in South Africa, the city centre of Johannesburg is still being re-established for development. The area once suffered from severe urban decay. With the financial district moved to Sandton, a new town 20 kilometres away, many high-end residential buildings and structures were deserted in the city centre, and the area has been notoriously known as the “No Go Area”.

    The hollow cylindrical design of the 54-storey Ponte City Apartments once rendered it a symbol of high-class residences. After it had been forsaken, however, the symbolic courtyard became a popular spot for committing suicide. This tallest ruin in Africa also used to be a paradise for criminals, who used different colours of curtains to indicate the different shady business they did inside the flats. Yet, today Ponte City Apartments has reborn and is now the comfortable home of locals in this boisterous city.

    While some choose to leave the city, many more choose to come. Every year, people from all over Africa flock to Johannesburg’s city centre, some hope to realise their dreams, and some simply hope to lead a stable life. An abandoned train station in the city centre provides shelter for a drifting musician, whose home is in the desert. He aspires to bring music into this city, and to express his belief in “great unity” with his guitar. Although he does not know how far he can go, at least he has found people of like mind here. He strolls around the city every morning, returning to this wrecked place, a legacy of the British colonial era, at night singing “Tomorrow Will Be Better”.

    03/12/2019
  • Talking with Matsu

    Talking with Matsu

    Matsu is an archipelago lying between China and Taiwan, where pristine fishing villages used to settle. The shortest distance between Matsu and Mainland China is merely 10 km, with only a strip of water separating them. However, since the Nationalist Government moved to Taiwan in 1949, the Islands’ fate had been turned upside down. After the takeover of the National Revolutionary Army, the villages had been transformed into an outpost for alleging resistance against the Mainland. Since then, the archipelago that abuts the Mainland had been completely isolated while guarding the faraway Taiwan that seemed foreign to it. During the heyday, there were 50 000 soldiers stationed on the Islands which were several times more than that of the locals. Such lifestyle with more soldiers than residents as well as the everyday life of the islanders under the threat of war and death had all been kept a secret for strategic reasons.

    As times have changed, the cross-strait relationship is no longer on a tightrope these days, the mission of Matsu has therefore changed. Most of the soldiers have withdrawn from Matsu, and those military strongholds, bunkers and underground tunnels that were built incessantly for this unwaged war in the course of the 36-year stationary, have all become ruins. Meanwhile, since the soldiers who had been supporting the Islands’ economy have left, the islanders’ livelihood could not be sustained, hence departure form Matsu, making it a more desolate place after it regained freedom.

    However, more have chosen to stay, including a young lady who returned from studying in Taiwan and has visited all ruins on the Islands in 3 years; and an experienced former Commissioner of the Department of Cultural Affairs who have altered the military strongholds into cafés and family-run lodgings. They view the ruins as the unique legacies of Matsu and make those behind the times fashionable. Among the ruins, they seek for the future of Matsu.

    26/11/2019
  • A 5-star home

    A 5-star home

    Beira is the second largest city in Mozambique, at the southern part of Africa. It locates along the coast of the Indian Ocean, and there stands a five-star hotel near the shore. This hotel was once the most luxurious resort in Africa, but unfortunately it has been abandoned for almost 50 years. The gorgeous spiral staircase and the artistically decorated dance floor are now all beyond recognition.

    The hotel was in fact a white elephant project, and during the civil war it became a garrison base. After the war, families of the army members and refugees who had left their homes began to move into the 116 ocean view rooms. Some people have even been living in there for 30 years.

    Ever since the hotel was full for the first time, it has never been quiet. Today there are 4000 “guests” and they all find their own way and order to live in this small community without water and electricity supply. Yet, they all know that this ruin is dangerous to live in, and they all dream that one day they could leave this borrowed space.

    19/11/2019
  • Not a ghost town

    Not a ghost town

    Scheldt River is the lifeline of Antwerp in Belgium. “All an Antwerper has to do to connect with the rest of the world is simply dip his hand into the Scheldt’s water”, a former Antwerp mayor once said.

    The river’s branches of various sizes were the city’s earliest sanitary sewer system which was later transformed by the government gradually to become the sewer system crisscrossing the city. It was not until the installation of pipelines in 2001 that the old sewer service was officially ceased. The Scheldt River that flows from France and enters Belgium before reaching Netherland has bestowed Antwerp with the advantages as a port city. In the last 50 years, villages on both sides of the river banks have been transformed into container terminals along with the development of the port. And now there is only one village left – Doel.

    Doel was once populated by over a thousand people, but the number has dropped to around 20 today. For years, they have been standing against the ambiguous land resumption policy on one hand while believing that conservation counts much more than the unnecessary expansion of the port on the other. Their holdout has already come to the third generation who insist on living in this ghost town surrounded by dilapidated houses vacated deliberately. They simply want to deliver a message: The last generation does not stand alone, every generation cares for this last village by the river.

    12/11/2019
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