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    监制:Dora Tang


    "The highest purpose of design is for human use", said Japanese pioneer industrial designer Sori Yanagi.

    Apart from functions and aesthetics, the best designs also take user needs into consideration. This people-oriented design mindset stems from empathy. By combining it with creativity and user experience, a unique form of wisdom for daily living is born.

    In this series, we'll look at how designers from various disciplines work together with researchers, makers, educators, professionals and even users to come up with some of the most amazing and caring designs for everyday life.

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    24/11/2020
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    Dining alone, watching movies alone, shopping alone.
    Will that make you feel free or lonely?
    How can design help you enjoy spending time on your own?

    Kevin, an interior designer and restaurant head chef, said, “Sitting at the low counter, you can chat with the chef anytime, and you can continue to eat alone. While sitting there on your own, you also know that there are other people by your side.”

    How much can a person understand the needs of another person?
    How much can a person understand his / her own needs?

    Hans and Peter, founders of a self-ordering system company, said, “Waiters cannot remember the preferences of thousands of diners visiting every day, while self-ordering system can provide customized recommendations.”

    In the crowd, you think nobody is watching you, and you can finally be yourself.
    However, when being immersed in the crowd, you notice you can only be yourself when someone is watching you.
    Being a foreigner in an unfamiliar city, one cannot find the feeling of home until he encounters a laundry.

    Designer Katol said, “Hong Kong people are short of time in solitude and silence.”

    Is there any good idea to design ways to experience the city on your own?

    Edit a visual content of the city’s small structures?
    Seize your lunch time for a journey to admire buildings?
    Let the birds’ twitters show you a birdwatching route?

    Perhaps, you will finally discover a broader world when you are not alone.

    重温

    CATCHUP
    09 - 11
    2020
    RTHK 31
    • Design for One

      Design for One

      Dining alone, watching movies alone, shopping alone.
      Will that make you feel free or lonely?
      How can design help you enjoy spending time on your own?

      Kevin, an interior designer and restaurant head chef, said, “Sitting at the low counter, you can chat with the chef anytime, and you can continue to eat alone. While sitting there on your own, you also know that there are other people by your side.”

      How much can a person understand the needs of another person?
      How much can a person understand his / her own needs?

      Hans and Peter, founders of a self-ordering system company, said, “Waiters cannot remember the preferences of thousands of diners visiting every day, while self-ordering system can provide customized recommendations.”

      In the crowd, you think nobody is watching you, and you can finally be yourself.
      However, when being immersed in the crowd, you notice you can only be yourself when someone is watching you.
      Being a foreigner in an unfamiliar city, one cannot find the feeling of home until he encounters a laundry.

      Designer Katol said, “Hong Kong people are short of time in solitude and silence.”

      Is there any good idea to design ways to experience the city on your own?

      Edit a visual content of the city’s small structures?
      Seize your lunch time for a journey to admire buildings?
      Let the birds’ twitters show you a birdwatching route?

      Perhaps, you will finally discover a broader world when you are not alone.

      24/11/2020
    • Design Making

      Design Making

      Is it a must to use our brains when designing? Not necessarily.
      For designers, it is even more free and fun using their hands first, then their brains, and find out the answers directly during the production process.

      Young concrete art designer Stefan said, “Every time I really look forward to how the final products will look after demoulding. The anticipation brings me pleasure.”

      Stefan loves mixing different materials with his concrete art design. He describes that the process is like cooking as we need to use our hands to adjust the concrete art recipes into ones that suit our tastes.

      Paper engineer and designer Soilworm said, “When you make something by hand, you will have more room to reconsider during the process, which will induce even more possibilities.”

      Soilworm and his years-long partner Michael have all along insisted in handling every production step on their own. The more experiences accumulated, the further the techniques can break away from the limitations, which enables them to walk further.

      Toy designer Lego said, “The pleasure of hand making things is that you can create something that doesn’t exist in real life, or creatures which I think they will exist in the future.”

      Lego and her husband Lewa are both vinyl toy designers. They gain inspiration from the surrealist worlds in their hearts, and turn surreal creatures into art collectibles. Each work has its own original story and even contains the couple’s thoughts on real life.

      Architecture conservator FUNG Wai-keung said, “If new techniques can be suitably integrated with traditional crafts, the crafts will possibly become art.”

      FUNG is well versed in the craft of terrazzo. He hit it off with Stefan, and the latter turned the creative ideas which FUNG could not realise into handicrafts using new techniques, which has brought new opportunities to this endangered traditional craft.

      Maria, Programme Manager of Makerbay Foundation, said, “Neither do you need to be equipped with all production skills at the beginning, nor learning through designing. By helping and sharing with one another, everyone can be a designer, or a maker.”

      Through sharing tools, ideas, production skills and experiences, people from different fields can inspire, exchange with and contribute ideas to one another, letting those with ideas put their designs into practice instead of getting stuck in the stage of thinking.



      Producer: Manfred CHOW

      17/11/2020
    • Design Departing

      Design Departing

      There is an average of about 40,000 deaths in Hong Kong each year, and every HongKonger will inevitably come across things relating to “farewell”.

      Death is a taboo subject that many people always want to avoid, yet birth, aging, illness and death are inevitable stages of life. As we cannot escape from them, it would be better for us to face them and make the necessary arrangements.

      From her experience of contacting different elderly people, Dr. Yanki LEE, a scholar of Design Study, finds that death is always mentioned in their conversations, “It is up to us to plan for our deaths.” She feels that design can remind middle-aged people and young people to respect the elderly people’s thoughts on death, and through the process of fostering inter-generational creation, designing tools for farewell can explore the original meaning of death.

      In fact, death is remote and difficult to imagine for ordinary people. As such, through some environmental settings and arrangements, we can get involved, so that personal feelings can be transformed into discussions of rational thinking.

      Design Editor Ire TSUI said, “I have always thought that we could not choose our own ash scattering device in scattering of ashes in the Gardens of Remembrance. However, through different visits, I find out that the ordinance concerned stipulates that we can choose and use the ash scattering device according to our own wishes. But what does it mean by the ash scattering device we chose?”

      From the issue of death to the design of “goods for death”, Product Designer LEE Chi-wing said, “The whole project is a co-creation plan, which is not the same as ordinary creation. This product benefits the public and their interests, and the items concerned will present how people face death, parting and the expectations and needs of thinking about their loved ones.”

      To understand life and death better, the best way is to learn to share. CHUK Ka-lok, the founder of a café, said, “When participants come to Death Café, they don’t know who will be sitting next to them, and they will communicate with each other with mutual respect. I hope that after leaving Death Café, they can talk about life and death with people around them in a more open manner.”

      Death has never been one person’s own business. How can we transform from fear of death to facing it proactively through a new design perspective?

      10/11/2020
    • Design Cycling

      Design Cycling

      In recent years, many big cities have returned to cycling as their mode of transport in order to alleviate the problems of pollution and traffic congestion. In a small, fast-paced city with high urban density like Hong Kong, how can the environmental friendly and economical bicycles integrate into people’s daily life with the help of design?

      Winnie and her elder brother Paul inherited a bicycle shop from their father. They have been fixing bicycles for local residents in Sham Shui Po for more than forty years. Apart from leisure bicycles, they also helped to modify a lot of delivery bicycles which were used to make a living. They customised bicycle designs according to specific needs and witnessed the evolution of bicycle in the life of the general public.

      As early as in the late 1970’s, the planning of Tai Po New Town separated cycle tracks and roads, and linked the tracks to major transport nodes. In fact, this kind of planning was rarely found in the entire world back then.

      Peter Cookson SMITH, the planner of the Tai Po New Town, said, “Cycle tracks become part of the practical transport system, and also serve as recreational facilities.”

      “Bicycle-sharing” sprung up a few years ago. It brought convenience to cyclists, but also caused various problems. The number of service providers has dropped from the peak of six to two. Ken and Kenneth are founders of a bicycle-sharing platform. They grew up in Tai Po and were cyclists since they were small, therefore they were dedicated to the design of the complementary package of bicycle-sharing. From minor issues like bicycle hardware to major issues like directions of docking position, locking mode and offline services, they have been improving the designs continuously based on user opinions and habits.

      Ken, the founder of a bicycle-sharing platform, said, “We spent much time building an offline operation team, so as to ensure that the quantity and quality of bicycles are under control.”

      The combination of cycle tracks and bicycle-sharing allows residents of the New Territories to ride bicycles safely and continuously. On the contrary, it is still impractical to implement this mode of transport in crowded urban areas with narrow roads – However, everything has an exception.

      Hughes, the designer of city cycling routes, said, “Bicycles are a mean of transport. We can explore a city with bicycles. They can also act as a median to connect people.”

      As such, he established a cycling culture platform and organized various cycling activities, such as bicycle picnic and bicycle market, in order to promote the living culture of “city bicycles”.

      03/11/2020
    • Design Organizing

      Design Organizing

      Everybody is his / her own design arranger.
      Your work desk, Mum’s kitchen, and garage mechanics’ tool walls implicitly have their own order.

      The order is formed by years of accumulation of user needs. So, will there be any difference if designers devise their own arranging systems?

      Graphic designer Ray LAU said, “This design itself is originated from an unpleasant experience the user encountered, and that’s why we attach the most importance to whether designers can attain their purposes in a fast and comfortable way.”

      What LAU mentioned was his self-invested paper swatch system, which categorises paper materials according to their types, colours and weights from the perspective of designers. With the system’s level of detail comparable to that of reference books, it is beneficial to design students who seldom have the chance to access paper materials.

      After all, being familiar with materials is the basic design knowledge which designers of any field should have. For this reason, an architectural firm has even set up its own material library, which occupies one-fifth of its total office area.

      Architect Frank LEUNG said, “We hope that the material library can bring new ideas to our colleagues, and inspire them when they see different objects, colours and lustre, and materials being put together.”

      The Fashion Archive of the Hong Kong Design Institute carries the same concept. Therefore, after it was relocated to the new location, the ways of categorisation and storage of its collections were re-devised to facilitate teaching.

      HO Ho-tak, Fashion Archivist of the Fashion Archive, said, “The Archive is a teaching platform. We hope that by using our current collections, we can design workshops of various types based on students’ interest, and make them keep coming back to learn.”

      When designing the ways of arranging, we are also designing the user experience. If the users are primary school students, the arranging system will be different.

      The arrangement of the bookshelves in the newly-established library of the Pat Heung Central Primary School is a breakthrough of traditions, and the book classification system is also unprecedented.

      The school’s teacher-librarian Miss WONG Pui-mei (transliteration) said, “We classify books according to their themes and put round shape stickers of different colours on the books, so that students can find books to read depending on their interest.”

      There are endless ways for arranging. Have you found your own yet?

      27/10/2020
    • Design Caring

      Design Caring

      There are people of different ages and abilities in a society, and they all have their own different needs. Barrier-free design can take care of the daily needs of people with disabilities. An inclusive design can cater for a small number of people, and at the same time be suitable for all people. How do designers come up with thoughtful designs out of empathy?

      Designer Kevin WONG said, “The revolutionary idea of a smart phone without a screen does not just cater for blind people, a good design should be able to be enjoyed by all people.”

      As such, WONG and his team developed a voice intelligent ring, which was a brand new concept. The original intention of the design is to enable his dad, who is blind, to use smartphones. How can designers make communication more barrier-free through technology?

      Architect Raymond LEUNG said, “No matter it is a product or an architectural design, it must be unique, functional, and inclusive as well.”

      Raymond LEUNG is the third-generation heir of a vacuum bottle brand and the architect, who is responsible for transforming the factory building that produced vacuum bottles into a hotel. While retaining the style of industrial architecture, how can he integrate barrier-free facilities into the environment in a natural way?

      Mr. Leung Chu-hei, the Superintendent of a care and attention home for the aged, said, Regarding the design of various services in the daily living of elderly in nursing homes, our philosophy is to let them live their lives as before they were admitted to the nursing home.”

      He and the nursing home team engaged design thinking and creativity in formulating the daily life schedule, activities and diet of the elderly, resulting in the lives of the elderly having small but wonderful changes.

      CHAN Wing-lam, the designer of activity pavilion, said, “A good design can make its users feel satisfied and being taken care of.”

      In order to encourage the elderly to do more exercises, CHAN and her design team have produced several types of multi-functional recreational activity pavilions, which combine training and exercise elements to intergenerational facilities.

      How can these people-oriented designs make the users feel being cared for and taken care of?

      Producer: Lun Pui-ki

      20/10/2020
    • Design Adapting

      Design Adapting

      Every now and again, we come across ingenious DIY designs scattered in the streets and alleys we walk past. These items, which have been designed by users to suit their own needs, perfectly exemplify the people-oriented aspect of the design mindset.

      An inconspicuous rubbish bin brings out the relationship between public design and grassroots workers. A detail neglected in the original design is redressed by a cleaner’s resourcefulness, and even triggers a social movement which addresses the welfare of grassroots workers.

      A noodle shop owner designs one-of-a-kind tools according to his own needs, from sauce bottles to a storage box for deliveries. Self-made items of various sizes can be found throughout his shop, turning it into a small DIY design museum.

      A civic organisation comprising a group of makers have redesigned a multi-purpose trolley after researching various pushcarts which have been modified by their users, all in the hope of demonstrating the people-oriented principle of design once again.

      If you know how to listen, you can be a designer in your everyday life too!

      13/10/2020
    • Design Sharing

      Design Sharing

      In recent years, “sharing economy” has become very popular. Users of offices, kitchens and bicycles can share the consumption cost with strangers, in order to make the most of the object or the space, and to maximize the economic benefits. However, if a designer wants to promote the concept of “sharing” instead of “shared use”, what will be the difference in the design point of view?

      Architect TSE Kam-wing, Kenneth said, “Rehabilitation of buildings and addition of new facilities actually restore a linkage in the community.”

      "Viva Blue House” is not only a project of building rehabilitation. From its way of rehabilitation to the “Good Neighbour Scheme” started afterwards, it invites the neighbourhood to participate in the project and contribute their talents.

      Suki CHAU, the designer of the “Good Neighbour Scheme”, said, “We are not only looking for tenants, but also good neighbours.”

      Unlike the impersonal management of private housing estates, through designs of hardware and software, designers encourage residents to help each other, so as to create a living environment which residents are willing to share.

      Match CHEN, the designer of “Show Hand Show”, said, “We design an interpersonal relationship which gathers people with various talents, and (let them) develop naturally.”

      Designers set up simple mobile stages in various corners in the city, and gradually attract residents passing by to demonstrate all kinds of talents freely on the street.

      There is also a new kind of intelligent water refill machine which allows users to communicate and share their user experience. Simply by displaying the number of plastic bottles saved by carrying your own water bottle, the water refill machine becomes a station to share environmental awareness. Even the designer cannot predict these kinds of sharing activities derived by users.

      06/10/2020
    • Design Playing

      Design Playing

      Is there no choice when it comes to playing?

      Although the moulded designs of playground equipment adopted in recent years have ensured safety, they have also sacrificed the interest and possibilities of playing.

      Photographer LEUNG Kwong-fuk said, “In the past, the designs of playground equipment were really creative.”

      LEUNG’s photographs have witnessed the change of the older playground equipment in Hong Kong since the end of the 1980’s, and it makes him sigh with regret.

      Artist FAN Lok-yi said, “These days, most playgrounds use modular playground equipment, which is all in red, yellow and blue, and made of plastic or metal. It won’t show you a strong sense of locality or identity.”

      She has studied the Shek Lei Playground in the 1960’s, which was once an avant-garde playground designed by an American artist.

      Potato YU, person-in-charge of creative play activities, said, “To create together a flexible play space which can be changed constantly in a place.” Bringing with him various materials, YU designs different play experiences on the grass in parks with kids.

      Another community group has proposed to the government a collaborative approach concerning the renovation design of several micro-parks in the old district.

      Designer Jonathan MAK said, “This design is to provide a living room for this small community.”

      MAK and his team are responsible for the project of Yee Bo Fong in Tsuen Wan. As early as prior to the designing, they had been constantly listening to the needs of the local residents. Every park has its own service targets, and every resident needs a park design proposal which is suitable for him / her.


      Another designer HUNG Kam-fai said, “People from different age groups have their rights to pursue play concepts in parks which are suitable for them.”

      In fact, design is not something beyond one’s reach. We can always find the solutions to the difficulties encountered in our daily life from user experiences.

      Architect Robert WONG said, “If the users of each district take part in the designing, the parks create will have their own characteristics. If this design mode can be developed in a sustainable way, it will be the best for the community.”

      Producer: Manfred CHOW

      29/09/2020
    • Design Sleeping

      Design Sleeping

      Hongkongers may be the most sleep-deprived people on the planet.

      Citizens can be seen dozing off in broad daylight everywhere. Starting with their lethargic demeanour, we tell the evolutionary tale of bed design in Hong Kong. The bunk bed, cage bed, transformer bed, and smart capsule bed are all based on the principle of stacking in a 1 m x 2 m space. The multi-level beds and buildings actually reflect the changes in city’s living environment: from cage homes and public housing estates to nano flats and rent-by-the-hour hostels.

      We often preach about how designs should be people-oriented, but sometimes they may just be born of necessity.

      The people of Hong Kong work their fingers to the bone at the expense of their sleep, just to chase the pipe dream of being able to afford a space that they can call their own. But if we do not sleep, how can we dream for a better future?

      The various bed designs are a reflection of how the people of this city view work, rest, and dreams.

      22/09/2020
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