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    监制:Diana Wan

    11/07/2018

    Modern day China is the backdrop for the political thriller, “Song of Grief”, by local theatre company, Cinematic Theatre. It’s the story of what happens when a man with a knife storms into an elite primary school and attacks children. It explores the conflicting motivations of those deciding just how the government should respond to, or cover up, the event and its motivating factors.

    Last week, we looked at contemporary art in Tai Kwun, but of course the police station, court, and prison complex has also been part of its neighbourhood for more than a century and has been a major part of that neighbourhood’s history. The exhibition “100 Faces of Tai Kwun” tells 100 stories of the people who lived, or still live, in the nearby streets.

    The town of Iznik in Turkey is known for its decorated pottery, highly coloured and emphasising, in particular, cobalt blue patterns under a colourless glaze. The tradition started in the last quarter of the 15th century but had diminished and practically disappeared by the end of the 17th century. But Iznik pottery is still a source of inspiration, and until the middle of August, the University of Hong Kong’s University Museum and Art Gallery is presenting 40 ceramic works by Turkish artists Mehmet Gursoy and Nida Olcar that fuse the tradition with contemporary design.

    Now in its third year, the Altamira Hong Kong International Guitar Symposium is a chance for classical guitarists to meet, perform, chat, and explore the heritage and musical range of the instrument. The five-day event includes concerts, forums, and masterclasses, and features over 20 speakers from all over the world.
    Joining us now in the studio are “SoloDuo” from Italy and the symposium’s organiser, Au Man-bun.


    联络: wanyt@rthk.hk


    集数

    EPISODES
    • Robert Lepage

      Robert Lepage "887", Heyse Ip's photographic work & in the studio: poet & singer-songwriter Deborah Mannas

      Robert Lepage is a playwright, film director, stage director and actor. He’s also the founder of the multidisciplinary company Ex Machina, conceived as a laboratory and incubator for performing arts, dance, opera, music, filmmaking, video art and multimedia. As part of this year’s Hong Kong Arts Festival, Lepage examined the process of memory and his own past in the autobiographical production: “887”.

      Heyse Ip is a Hong Kong-born artist, currently living and working in London, who is interested in finding new ways to approach photography. Among other experiments, he has used everyday objects such as kitchen gloves, painting his hands with light absorbent materials to create his works through a pinhole camera. At Lumenvisum at JCCAC until the end of this month, Ip is showcasing and documenting his unconventional approaches to the photographic art form.

      Coming from an Anglo-Indian background, poet and singer-songwriter Deborah Mannas says “she grew up in traditional India but in an untraditional family.”
      She adds that in her family “no topic was taboo and debates on social issues and injustices were normal family life.” Having studied psychology, she likes to bring her interest in human behaviour into her song-writing. Last year, she joined forced with musical director AgnesQ and the neo-Soul and funk band, Soul Sessions to produce her solo album, “Inspired”. The team is now working on a second album, planned for release this June. They are here to tell us more.

      20/03/2019
    • Artist & curator Ivy Ma, Sarah Crowner's abstract forms & in the studio: Winter Bagels

      Artist & curator Ivy Ma, Sarah Crowner's abstract forms & in the studio: Winter Bagels

      Hello and welcome to The Works, I’m Ben Tse, on my own this week as Ben Pelletier is off on his travels. Later in the show, Kaki and Cup, the two musicians who make up the local acoustic-pop duo Winter Bagels, are here to play for us. But first, mixed media artist Ivy Ma not only focuses on her own artistic creation, she also teaches and curates.
      In January, she curated “By the Window” an exhibition showcasing the works of nine Hong Kong artists that explores the idea that a painting can be a window between the artist and the audience.

      American artist, Sarah Crowner is known for her bold and colourful paintings and tile works often consisting of abstract forms. She says she draws inspiration from architecture, nature, art and design. One technique she uses in her “stitched paintings” involves sewing painted canvas panels together with an industrial sewing machine. Until the 20th of this month, the Simon Lee Gallery is presenting her first solo exhibition in Asia, “Paintings for the Stage”.

      The members of acoustic-pop duo “Winter Bagels”, Kaki and Cup met in a guitar class in 2012. Quickly discovering a shared love of writing original songs, they formed the band in 2016. Then they went busking for a month in Eastern Europe. Kaki and Cup say the trip inspired them not only musically, but also personally. They are here with Billy Lee of our sister programme 艺坊星期天 to tell us more.

      13/03/2019
    • Taiwan heavy metal band Chthonic: Freddy Lim & in the studio: cellist Austin Lam & Artem Konstantinov

      Taiwan heavy metal band Chthonic: Freddy Lim & in the studio: cellist Austin Lam & Artem Konstantinov

      We’re going to start by bringing you the last of our new series of reports from Taiwan. The Taiwanese heavy metal band Chthonic made the news in a manner they may not have swished last December when Hong Kong denied their lead singer Freddy Lim’s entry to the SAR to take part in a concert due to his “lack of special skills”.
      Not so coincidentally perhaps, he is also a lawmaker and the founder of Taiwan’s New Power Party.

      After meeting Artem Konstandinov, principal cellist of the City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong, while taking part in a competition, Austin Lam began studying with him at the age of five. He has also studied composition in the Hong Kong Academy for the Performing Arts Junior Programme. Despite being only eleven years old this month, Austin has already received several international prizes. Austin and Artem are here to tell us more.

      06/03/2019
    • Interview with photographer Gijsbert Hanekroot, amibent group Cigarette After Sex & conductor Marin Alsop

      Interview with photographer Gijsbert Hanekroot, amibent group Cigarette After Sex & conductor Marin Alsop

      We’re devoting part one to rock and pop music, and we’re beginning with the work of a photographer from the Netherlands known for his images of rock, pop, and jazz musicians. Gijsbert Hanekroot says the first shot of a musician he remembers taking was in 1963. It showed jazz great John Coltrane holding his tenor saxophone and waiting to go on stage. In the years since, Gijsbert has photographed many of the great popular musicians of our time.

      Singer-songwriter Greg Gonzalez recorded the songs for Cigarettes After Sex’s widely popular EP, “I” in a four-storey stairway at his alma mater, the University of Texas at El Paso. Gonzalez described the experience as “basically an accident; kind of an experiment”. Since he began with Cigarettes After Sex in 2008, collaborators have come and gone, coalescing into the band’s present line-up. Gonzales refers to their laid-back music as “ambient pop”, and they brought their relaxed and nostalgic sound to Hong Kong for Clockenflap last November. We caught up with them while they are here.

      This year’s Hong Kong Arts Festival features over 1,700 artists in 166 performances. The festival’s concert series opened last Thursday with Marin Alsop conducting the São Paulo Symphony Orchestra. Alsop is a trailblazer in the orchestral and classical scene. She is the first woman to have conducted the Last Night of the BBC Proms, and the first female artistic director of the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra. Born in New York, Alsop decided she wanted to be a conductor at the age of nine. Somewhat later, she went on to study under Leonard Bernstein. She’s a strong believer in outreach programmes for young people, so apart from conducting the two concerts with the full orchestra in Hong Kong, she took some time out to mentor young music students. Just before those events, we went to talk to her.

      27/02/2019
    • The Works in Taiwan II: Taipei Biennial, Re-base & Ink Now, in the studio: zheng player Bou Kwan-ying

      The Works in Taiwan II: Taipei Biennial, Re-base & Ink Now, in the studio: zheng player Bou Kwan-ying

      We’re beginning by continuing our trip to Taiwan. Last week, we introduced the first edition of Taipei Dangdai, a contemporary art fair that aims primarily to appeal to the Taiwanese market but that’s inevitably brought a lot of international attention to the island’ art scene and art collectors. Other than art fair like Taipei Dangdai that focuses on the art market, Taiwan is also full of creative entities that reflect the socio-political situations of the country.

      The Himalayan region is known as the “roof of the world”. It is home to Tibetans, Nepalese, Bhutanese, Gurkhas and the Ladakh people. They are connected not only by the area’s unique landscape but also by similar religious beliefs. On show at the art museum of the Chinese University of Hong Kong Institute of Chinese Studies, “Jewels of Transcendence: Himalayan and Mongolian Treasures” showcases more than 400 exquisite ornaments and religious objects, from the 13th through 20th centuries, that come from the Mongolian and Himalayan regions.

      20/02/2019
    • The Works in Taiwan I: Taipei Dangdai & in our studio: pianist Scott MacIsaac

      The Works in Taiwan I: Taipei Dangdai & in our studio: pianist Scott MacIsaac

      We take a trip to Taiwan. Many people familiar with modern and contemporary art from Taiwan have come to know it from the Taipei Biennial, the precursors of which were two Taipei Fine Arts Museum exhibition projects held in alternating years from 1984 which were later consolidated. Now Taiwan’s contemporary art has a new major art showcase, Taipei Dangdai, which was held in Taipei last month. Our producer, Yuki Wong went there to find out more.

      Canadian pianist Scott MacIsaac studied music at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and went on to study to become a Master of Music at Yale University. A winner of numerous awards in many competitions, he has performed as a soloist in North America, Asia and Western Europe. The New York Times calls him a pianist with “brio and imagination” and La Presse lauds his playing for its “speed, clarity, breath and musicality.” He was in Hong Kong during the Lunar New Year holidays to visit his grandfather. We took the chance to speak to him.

      13/02/2019
    • CNY Special: Ben Pelletier tours Xiqu Centre, Ben Tse doing Cantonese porcelain, Billy Lee making flower plaque & Zenwester plays 《喜气洋洋》

      CNY Special: Ben Pelletier tours Xiqu Centre, Ben Tse doing Cantonese porcelain, Billy Lee making flower plaque & Zenwester plays 《喜气洋洋》

      Kung Hey Fat Choy! Hello and welcome to our Chinese New Year special.

      For today’s show, we’ve been out and about to bring you traditions, handcrafts and programmes that are full of festive flavour. In part two, I’ll be talking to master Wong Nai-chung who teaches me how to make a much scaled down version of the flower plaque. Later in part one though, I visit master Cheung Kam-ping in Tai Kwun to learn a little about the tradition of painting Cantonese porcelain, an art that has fewer and fewer practitioners. And we’re beginning with my trip to the newly-opened Xiqu Centre in the West Kowloon Cultural District, where the district’s Executive Director of Performing Arts Louis Yu took me on a walk around its first performing arts venue to be completed.

      In part one, the Bens were out seeing and celebrating examples of traditional Chinese culture, and now it’s my turn. Chinese flower plaques have long been built to celebrate festivals, weddings and inaugurations. They’re symbols of luck, happiness and prosperity. Master Wong Nai-chung was kind enough to explain a little of the craft to me. Regular viewers of the show will know that most weeks we have music for you. Today is no exception. Hong Kong Chinese Orchestra’s suona principal and guan player Ma Wai-him and his band, “Zenwester” are here to play us a tune that most of you will easily recognise.

      Well that’s it from us for our Lunar New Year special. From all of us on The Works, best wishes for a happy, healthy, rewarding and creative, Year of the Pig.

      06/02/2019
    • Photojournalist Steve Raymer, Gallery Exit: Shek O & studio performance: percussionist Anna Fan

      Photojournalist Steve Raymer, Gallery Exit: Shek O & studio performance: percussionist Anna Fan

      Photojournalist, author and educator Steve Raymer is known for his work with the National Geographic Magazine. His subjects have ranged from the global hunger crisis to the construction of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline and the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul. Raymer has also taught media ethics, newsgathering, and how to report and shoot war and terrorism for over two decades at Indiana University, where he still teaches as an emeritus professor. He recently visited Hong Kong to open an exhibition of his work at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents’ Club.

      Gallery Exit is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year. To mark the occasion, the gallery has organised a series of special programmes for the opening of its latest exhibition, “Shek-O Sublime”. 24 artists were commissioned to create new works, spending time in the village of Shek O, to reflect on and connect with the location.
      The exhibition also includes paintings made by the late master Luis Chan in this idyllic place.

      Whether in classical music, pop, world music, or jazz, female drummers have traditionally been a rarity. Even in pop, as recently as the 1960s, women percussionists such as Honey Lantree of the Honeycombs or Karen Carpenter of The Carpenters stood out for their gender. Since then though, female percussionists from Evelyn Glennie to Sheila E have provided new inspiration for young women who’d like to enter the field. Anna Fan studied music at Hong Kong Baptist University. She then went on to spend another six years at Berklee College of Music. Although she focuses on jazz, she’s played with bands whose music ranges from jazz to hard rock, African, and other world music. She’s here right now to tell us more.

      30/01/2019
    • SPARK: Art, Science & Creativity, in the studio: indie band, Chonotenki

      SPARK: Art, Science & Creativity, in the studio: indie band, Chonotenki

      Technology hasn’t just reshaped many aspects of our daily lives, it has also redefined and changed how art is made. Today’s artists may use an array of technological and scientific tools, including lasers, augmented reality, 3D printing, computer programming, robotics and data, to create their works. Last weekend, to celebrate its 70 years in Hong Kong, the British Council organised a three-day festival, “SPARK: The Science and Art of Creativity”. It included more than 30 events, involving roughly 50 creative and education partners from the UK and Hong Kong and bringing together art and science.

      Chonotenki or 超能天气 is a local alternative band. The four members described it as a “super happy-go-lucky” band that strives to be part of the Hong Kong music scene come rain or shine. Formed in 2016, the band writes its own songs and has put a demo together. They’ll perform at February’s Freespace Happening. They’re here now to tell us more.

      23/01/2019
    • Art Director Tim Yip’s first exhibition in HK, “Blue – Art, Costumes and Memory” & in the studio: Dover Quartet

      Art Director Tim Yip’s first exhibition in HK, “Blue – Art, Costumes and Memory” & in the studio: Dover Quartet

      Stage and film art director and costume designer Tim Yip is known to most people for his work for the film “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”. On show at the Hong Kong Design Institute until the end of March is a large-scale solo exhibition of Yip’s work that showcases 30 years of his artistic endeavours.

      Premiere Performances’ annual chamber music festival, its tenth, starts today. Rechristened Beare's Premiere Music Festival 2019, the nine-day festival includes five concerts and over 15 educational events. Among the highlights are mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato performing her album “In War and Peace”, and a collaboration between Grammy nominated mandolinist, Avi Avital and the Dover Quartet, which has been described by The Chicago Tribune as the next Guarneri String Quartet. The quartet’s four members are with us right now in the studio.

      16/01/2019