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    监制:Diana Wan

    12/06/2019

    The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

    Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.


    联络: wanyt@rthk.hk


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    • Venice Biennale I: HK Pavilion, Cheng Ting Ting's

      Venice Biennale I: HK Pavilion, Cheng Ting Ting's "Recipient Absent" & in the studio: Rendezvous Quartet

      The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

      Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.

      12/06/2019
    • 4th June: Diminishing creative space & in the studio: Wuji Ensemble x Mo-Men-T

      4th June: Diminishing creative space & in the studio: Wuji Ensemble x Mo-Men-T

      In mainland China even the words “June 4th” are sensitive pretty much all the time. They are even more taboo every year as the date nears, and even more so this year as it’s the 30th anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. Although the candles can still be lit here in Hong Kong in Victoria Park, the organisers of the vigil, who also run the June 4th museum, say it’s getting harder every year. Last November, the Chinese political cartoonist Badiucao had an exhibition in Hong Kong cancelled after threats from the Chinese authorities. Six months later, he’s set to appear in a documentary about his art in the context of the event’s 30th anniversary. The hour-long film “China’s Artful Dissident” will be broadcast in Australia on June 4th. The film details how he was inspired by Tank Man, the individual who stood in front of the tanks in defiance. Here in Hong Kong, artists and art organisations who do work related to June 4th or indeed any political art, say they are also finding it increasingly hard to find spaces in which to present that work.

      What kind of sound would you expect to get if you combined a pipa, a double bass, electric guitar, trumpet, and piano? Well you can soon find out.
      The Chinese band, Wuji Ensemble and the jazz band Mo-Men-T are joining forces for the first time in an up-coming concert, “Boundless Groove” in which they mix Chinese and Western instruments to explore new possibilities.
      Both groups aim to develop a repertoire that’s experimental, innovative, and collaborative, and they are here to tell us more.

      05/06/2019
    • Photojournalist Liu Heung Shing, Art Deco at City U & in the studio: classical Indian music singer, Rahul Vellal

      Photojournalist Liu Heung Shing, Art Deco at City U & in the studio: classical Indian music singer, Rahul Vellal

      This year is the 30th anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. And, as every year, there’s already an information crackdown across mainland China on any possible references to the event in the media or on the internet. Activists in Beijing have been ordered to take mandatory “vacations”, been placed under house arrest, or are being strictly monitored. Today, most of us have smart phones, and photos from such a confrontation would come from dozens or hundreds of sources and quickly spread around the world. In 1989, taking pictures of, or documenting, such a large social movement as the one that led to that crackdown, was left mostly to professional photojournalists, photojournalists like Liu Heung Shing

      Next week we’ll look at how organising art events related to June 4th even in Hong Kong has become increasingly difficult. But for now, we turn to the past and more purely aesthetic concerns. We’re taking a look at the Art Deco style that flourished from the 1920s to the 1940s. As a movement, it was given a huge boost in Paris in 1925 by the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts. On show at the CityU Exhibition Gallery till the end of July, “Art Deco: The France-China Connection” showcases the history of the movement in France and its connections with China.

      11-year old Rahul Vellal is a singer and musician from Bangalore, India who mostly focuses on music in the religious Carnatic tradition. Although, neither of his parents have a music background, Rahul began to exhibit an interest in music from the age of two. With the support of his parents he started learning classical Indian music when he was four. His melodic voice has since made him an internet sensation. Not only have videos of his performances garnered 25 million views on YouTube, he’s won numerous music awards. He’s here in Hong Kong for a charity concert on Thursday called “Raaga & Rhythm: Music Without Borders”. The concert features 44 local and international musicians, and fuses Indian classical music, jazz and other popular music to raise funds for a social enterprise that promotes inclusiveness in our society. Rahul’s in our studio to tell us more.

      29/05/2019
    • Artist Hon Chi-fun restrospective exhibition,

      Artist Hon Chi-fun restrospective exhibition, "A Story of Light" & studio performance: Clementine Grimault

      Hon Chi-fun is one of Hong Kong’s most respected visual artists. His education began in a strict Confucian-style school that did not shy away from physical punishment, but that did introduce him to classical Chinese poems and calligraphy. Despite that conservative start, he went on to make art that went far beyond the traditional, both in techniques and approach, and that synthesised traditional East and modern West.

      French pianist, Clementine Grimault says she likes to perform the solo repertoire, but also enjoys lecture recitals, teaching, and working with others on collaborative projects.
      Clementine studied under British concert pianist and writer Paul Roberts. She graduated from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 2014. While still studying she’d taken on the challenging role of a pianist and actress in Iain Burnside’s music play, “Journeying Boys”. She’s here in Hong Kong to play in a concert for Le French May called, “Hommages, ballades and images”.

      22/05/2019
    • Niki de Saint Phalle exhibition, War Horse opens in HK & in the studio: HK Phil players for Pieter Vance Wyckoff Brain Tumor Foundation

      Niki de Saint Phalle exhibition, War Horse opens in HK & in the studio: HK Phil players for Pieter Vance Wyckoff Brain Tumor Foundation

      May brings, as every year, the Le French May Arts Festival. This year’s programme, which takes as its inspiration Victor Hugo’s “Life is a voyage”, is spread over two months and includes more than 120 events. We’ll be bringing you plenty from Le French May in coming weeks, but today we’re looking at the first Hong Kong exhibition of the work of painter, sculptor and conceptual artist Niki de Saint Phalle. On show at the Sha Tin Town Hall until early June are sculptures from her series “Nanas”.

      In 2007, the play “War Horse” based on Michael Morpurgo’s popular novel for older children and young adults, premiered on stage. Set amidst the horrors of the First World War, it tells the story of a boy called Albert and his bond with his horse Joey. Michael Morpurgo himself thought staging the novel posed insurmountable problems and that the National Theatre of Great Britain, “must be mad” even to try. Well, thankfully they did try, and the production, as adapted by Nick Stafford, went on to wow audiences and critics in the West End and on Broadway, and win Olivier and Tony Awards. Directed by Marianne Elliot and Tom Morris, it’s on show in Hong Kong, accompanied by Chinese surtitles, until early June, and well worth a visit.

      Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra bass trombonist Pieter Vance Wyckoff was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2018. This year, the PVW Brain Tumor Foundation was set up in his name under the auspices of the Hong Kong Neuro-Oncology Society and with the support of musicians from the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. The foundation hopes to raise awareness of brain tumours and provide support for patients and their families. Next Tuesday, a group of Pieter’s friends and colleagues are giving a concert to launch the foundation. Some of them are here to tell us more.

      15/05/2019
    • Design Trust x Haw Par Mansion, artist David Altmejd & in the studio: Groove Wind Quintet

      Design Trust x Haw Par Mansion, artist David Altmejd & in the studio: Groove Wind Quintet

      Many who have lived in or visited Hong Kong in recent decades will remember the fantasy land of The Tiger Balm Garden, and particularly its sometimes-garish sculptural depictions of hell. It was built in 1935 by Aw Boon Haw and Aw Boon Par, the two Burmese-Chinese brothers who created the ointment brand, Tiger Balm.
      The site, in Tai Hang, included the family mansion, the Haw Par Mansion, a private garden, and the Tiger Balm Garden which was opened to the public.

      Sadly, in 2004, the Tiger Balm Garden was demolished. The ownership of the mansion and the private garden was transferred to the government, which eventually designated it as the location for the Haw Par Music Foundation. At the end of March, the Hong Kong Design Trust used the premises to introduce a project that highlights the relationship between heritage and innovation. New York-based Canadian sculptor David Altmejd, says that the perfect object for him is “something that is extremely seductive and extremely repulsive at the same time.” His works draw on science, religion, magic, psychedelia, sci-fi and Gothic Romanticism. “The Vibrating Man” is not only his first exhibition in Hong Kong but also his inaugural exhibition with the White Cube gallery. It will be on show until 18th May.

      In 2014, five local musicians who’d graduated from a range of local and international music schools got together to form the Groove Wind Quintet. They formed the group with the idea that chamber music should reach a wider audience through including works from different periods. Other than music, they want to work with dancers to explore new possibilities and they are here to tell us more.

      08/05/2019
    • 100 Years of Bauhaus, sculptor Bernar Venet, Lam Tung-pang's

      100 Years of Bauhaus, sculptor Bernar Venet, Lam Tung-pang's "Saan Dung Gei" & in the studio: harmonica player Kelvin Leung

      This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus, the renowned school of art and design that has laid the foundation for much art education ever since.
      The Bauhaus, which in German means “building house”, was founded in Weimar on 1st April, 1919 by the architect Walter Gropius, Its mission was to introduce design into everyday life by combining crafts, fine arts, architecture, design and technology. To celebrate the anniversary, the Goethe-Institut in Hong Kong is presenting “100 Years of Bauhaus – Rethinking the World”, a series of programmes that includes exhibitions, films, lectures, and workshops.

      The early work of French artist Bernar Venet involved coating canvas with tar and using his body to create action paintings. He first visited New York in 1966. While in the US, inspired by the movement that was later to become defined as conceptual art, he started to create work with tubes, reproducing mathematical drawings and making sculptures that explored lines, circles and arcs. Venet visited Hong Kong in March for a solo exhibition at the De Sarthe gallery. While here he also created a new site-specific performance by making paintings with a paint-covered metal bar.

      Hong Kong artist, Lam Tung-pang’s works include paintings, site-specific installations, sound and video. He likes to mix traditional iconography and materials, using found objects and images to connect the past with the present, highlight collective memories, Hong Kong’s changing social environment, and its overlapping history and realities. At Blindspot Gallery, the exhibition “Saan Dung Gei”, a Cantonese phrase that means a journey into the mountain cave, showcases a series of works inspired by a journey on the newly-opened high-speed railway last year.

      Kelvin Leung is a former student at King’s College, known for, among other things, its harmonica band and quintet. Even before he graduated, Kelvin had already won harmonica awards both regionally and internationally. Cy Leo, whom you may remember appearing on our show last October, has been his teacher for the past eight years. Kelvin has now founded his own group, “RedBricks Harmonica Ensemble”. He’s here with pianist Johnny Pun to tell us more.

      01/05/2019
    • Louise Bourgeois and Jao Tsung-I exhibitions & in the studio: emo band Wellsaid

      Louise Bourgeois and Jao Tsung-I exhibitions & in the studio: emo band Wellsaid

      French-American artist Louise Bourgeois, who died on May 31st, 2010. She was born in Paris almost 100 years before. After the First World War, in 1919, the family moved to Choisy-le-Roi to set up a tapestry restoration business. During her childhood, Louise’s father embarked on many affairs, one most significantly with her English governess. Her father’s domination of the household, and her mother’s death in 1932 later came to motivate most of her art.

      Her childhood and its psychological effects on her came be major subjects. Her works reflect memories of her father, her mother’s illness, the pressures of childhood, and her own feelings of guilt, abandonment, and anger. The Hauser & Wirth gallery is currently presenting “My Own Voice Wakes Me Up”, the first solo exhibition of her work in Hong Kong, until 11th May.

      Jao Tsung-I, who died in February of last year, is known not only for his studies of Chinese culture – he wrote over 900 scholarly articles - but also for his own artistic achievement as a painter and calligrapher. His scholarly works cover 13 genres across the field of Chinese culture, including ancient history, oracle bone inscriptions, and “chuci”, ancient Chinese poetic songs from the southern state of Chu. On show at the University of Hong Kong Museum and Art Gallery, “Searching Through Teaching” showcases his teaching, as well as research materials, books, paintings, and calligraphy collected and produced over his academic career.

      The local emo band Wellsaid is an offshoot of math rock band, Emptybottles and the indie-rock label, Sweaty & Cramped. They write their own music, inspired by 1990s indie music, emo and punk. They’re about to release their debut nine-track album “Apart” in several formats, some of them a little bit retro.

      24/04/2019
    • Artist Yeung Tong-lung, Lui Shou-kwan 100th anniversary & gentrification in Shum Shui Po

      Artist Yeung Tong-lung, Lui Shou-kwan 100th anniversary & gentrification in Shum Shui Po

      Painter Yeung Tong-lung was born in Fujian. He was brought to Hong Kong by his family at the tail end of the Cultural Revolution in 1973, when Yeung was 17. He’d liked drawing since he was a child, but it was not an aspiration that met with approval during that tumultuous era. Today, a self-taught painter, whose large-scale figurative paintings depict Hong Kong’s everyday life, he continues to make art in what’s still a sometimes difficult environment.

      Lui Shou-kwan was one of the driving forces behind Hong Kong’s ink movement. He was born in 1919 in Guangdong, but Hong Kong was his home from 1948 until his death in 1975. His abstract, individualistic and westernised approach to the traditional art form earned him the title “The Father of New Ink”. To celebrate the hundredth anniversary of Lui’s birth this year, Alisan Fine Arts gallery is presenting an exhibition of 22 of his works, painted from 1957-1975. The exhibition runs until 16th May.

      It happens in cities all over the world: an area lags behind in development and houses the not so well-off members of society. Later students, young couples and maybe artists looking for somewhere they can afford to live, move in. Businesses follow them. And suddenly the poor who once made up the neighbourhood can barely afford to live there themselves. The process is called gentrification. In Hong Kong it’s accelerated by urban renewal projects and rapacious real estate developers.

      The role of art and artists as agents and cause of gentrification is increasingly debated. As the saying goes: “first come the artists, then come the hipsters”. Sham Shui Po is one traditionally working class neighbourhood that’s undergone big changes in recent years.

      17/04/2019
    • Art Basel & Art Central, Claylaboration & Sprüth Magers's Eau de Cologne

      Art Basel & Art Central, Claylaboration & Sprüth Magers's Eau de Cologne

      Art lovers from Hong Kong, Asia, and indeed all around the world, are spoilt for choice during Art March – a month packed with art fairs, exhibitions, auctions, festivals and plenty of other exciting events. With so much work on show, there’s a danger of even the most devoted art lover getting fatigued or simply running out of time to see them all. But don’t worry, in the coming weeks we’ll continue to bring you some of the art you might have missed. First, we’re looking at two of th.e biggest events: Art Basel and Art Central.

      As its name suggests, the exhibition “Claylaboration” involves both clay and collaboration, involving eight artists who work in ceramics working in partnership with artists from other disciplines. “Claylaboration” is on show at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum until April 15th. One of the participating ceramic artists is Yokky Wong, who decided to recreate a working space that brings back many emotional memories for her.

      The New York-based gallery Lévy Gorvy is the latest international gallery to set up an outpost in Hong Kong. It opened its new 2,500-square-foot space, its first in Asia, at the end of last month, during the Art Basel week. Also testing here is the Sprüth Magers gallery founded in Cologne in 1983 by Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers. It has produced a series of magazines and a series of exhibitions called, “Eau de Cologne” centered on issues of art, feminism and power. The first “Eau de Cologne” in 1985 featured five female artists. Sprüth Magers brought this project and its first Hong Kong exhibition here during Art Basel week, with a pop-up exhibition at H Queen’s. It ends on April 12th.

      10/04/2019