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监制:Shirley Lee


Urban dance has attracted young learners from all over the world. For the mainstream culture in the USA and the young people there, it has become an overwhelming force. When it has landed on foreign soil, it cross-breeds with distinctive local culture and the local historical background, and hence transforms itself into a series of peculiar cultural phenomena.

In Hong Kong, several young instructors of dance are under the influence of this overwhelming trend. “Tai Lun” (吴汉伦), “Wing” (刘咏谊) and “Ah Lun” (周启麟) are good friends with each other; in 2015, they participated together in the first “Arena” national competition of group dance in Chengdu. They lost. Without any awards, they were still undeterred; they even want to make a second attempt at the competition through which to reach out to the international scene. Their objective for 2016 is to collaborate to create a special dance work, and then head for the “Arena” competition in Chengdu again, with a troupe newly formed in Hong Kong. The three of them have very different personalities and preferences, but the same goals. They show us the passion and determination which exist only in the minority of Hongkongers; they also show us the influence of dancing on them.

Although Hong Kong is often described as lacking very much in culture, and notwithstanding the fact that pursuing our dreams is regarded by many as unrealistic, the three of them still have hopes, as they are expecting to win the approval of others by their own capability. Having learnt the lesson from the fiasco of the Arena competition last year, the three of them are trying to equip themselves better this time for another attempt.

Before setting off for Chengdu again, in order to prepare better for the competition, the three of them visited the USA, Japan and Korea to exchange with the local dancers and learn about the merits of different dancing skills, after which they choreographed a work for the competition. For these three dancers, this journey is not only about finding the true meanings of dancing, it is also a journey of self-discovery. In first five episodes, we will witness how the three of them find their way to the national stage step by step.

最新

LATEST
05/11/2019
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When it comes to pole dance, some may think of debauched nightclubs, smoking hot strippers, and some may even consider it a pornographic and unpresentable acrobatic display. In fact, it is easier said than done to pose and perform alluring moves on a pole. Not only must the dancer have sufficient muscle strength to hold a bodily posture, but a flexible physique is also required to pose beautifully and gracefully.

Narlton, a 25-year-old pole dancing instructor, likes to integrate acrobatic elements into pole dance and challenge the limits of both muscle strength and somatic flexibility. Narlton opened his own dancing studio in January this year and began to promote pole dance as a form of exercise. There have been more and more advocates fighting to make pole dance an Olympic sport in recent years in the choreographic circle around the globe, while the international competitions of pole dance growing more sizeable. Narlton points out that the scoring criteria of such competitions are standardised, similar to those of the gymnastic competitions in the Olympic Games. Narlton went to Japan in April this year to participate in an international competition, during which not only did he win a prize, but he also noticed that all others prize winners were members of national teams. He was the only person who joined on an individual basis, where the staff were also surprised that he did not have a Hong Kong team uniform. This experience is etched in his memory, and it also drives him to set his mind in promoting pole dance with a view to having a Hong Kong pole dance team in the future.

The 22-year-old Leon believes that pole dance is a form of performance art that shall not be limited to females. He says he likes to transcend beyond conventional boundaries. He is fully aware that ordinary people would be startled to see a man pole dancing, and some may even frown upon such idea. However, he wants to challenge people’s comfort zone and allow everyone to introspect through his dance, so that people can understand neither genders shall be prejudiced. Yet, in a rather conservative city like Hong Kong where the market of pole dance is still small, Leon does not have many opportunities to perform. Leon targets to go beyond Hong Kong and get invited to teach pole dance around the world, but fame is the first thing he needs if such target is to be achieved. Therefore, he resolved to participate in an international competition called Mr Pole Dance, in Sydney, Australia in June 2016, and went head to head with elite dancers from around the globe for the zenith.

As pole dance is a form of performance art as well as an exercise, why can’t it be promoted? Symone, an Australian pole dancing instructor who was raised in Hong Kong, has been teaching pole gymnastics to children since a few years back. Her youngest student is only seven years old, and the sprightly energetic students of hers act like monkeys on the pole and indulge in an exhilarating mood every time they come to her class. Symone points out that, most of her current students are foreigners. She hopes that parents in Hong Kong will gradually recognise pole dance as an interest activity after school.

重温

CATCHUP
10 - 11
2019
RTHK 31
  • Men On Pole

    Men On Pole

    When it comes to pole dance, some may think of debauched nightclubs, smoking hot strippers, and some may even consider it a pornographic and unpresentable acrobatic display. In fact, it is easier said than done to pose and perform alluring moves on a pole. Not only must the dancer have sufficient muscle strength to hold a bodily posture, but a flexible physique is also required to pose beautifully and gracefully.

    Narlton, a 25-year-old pole dancing instructor, likes to integrate acrobatic elements into pole dance and challenge the limits of both muscle strength and somatic flexibility. Narlton opened his own dancing studio in January this year and began to promote pole dance as a form of exercise. There have been more and more advocates fighting to make pole dance an Olympic sport in recent years in the choreographic circle around the globe, while the international competitions of pole dance growing more sizeable. Narlton points out that the scoring criteria of such competitions are standardised, similar to those of the gymnastic competitions in the Olympic Games. Narlton went to Japan in April this year to participate in an international competition, during which not only did he win a prize, but he also noticed that all others prize winners were members of national teams. He was the only person who joined on an individual basis, where the staff were also surprised that he did not have a Hong Kong team uniform. This experience is etched in his memory, and it also drives him to set his mind in promoting pole dance with a view to having a Hong Kong pole dance team in the future.

    The 22-year-old Leon believes that pole dance is a form of performance art that shall not be limited to females. He says he likes to transcend beyond conventional boundaries. He is fully aware that ordinary people would be startled to see a man pole dancing, and some may even frown upon such idea. However, he wants to challenge people’s comfort zone and allow everyone to introspect through his dance, so that people can understand neither genders shall be prejudiced. Yet, in a rather conservative city like Hong Kong where the market of pole dance is still small, Leon does not have many opportunities to perform. Leon targets to go beyond Hong Kong and get invited to teach pole dance around the world, but fame is the first thing he needs if such target is to be achieved. Therefore, he resolved to participate in an international competition called Mr Pole Dance, in Sydney, Australia in June 2016, and went head to head with elite dancers from around the globe for the zenith.

    As pole dance is a form of performance art as well as an exercise, why can’t it be promoted? Symone, an Australian pole dancing instructor who was raised in Hong Kong, has been teaching pole gymnastics to children since a few years back. Her youngest student is only seven years old, and the sprightly energetic students of hers act like monkeys on the pole and indulge in an exhilarating mood every time they come to her class. Symone points out that, most of her current students are foreigners. She hopes that parents in Hong Kong will gradually recognise pole dance as an interest activity after school.

    05/11/2019
  • Last Battle

    Last Battle

    After their visits to the USA, Japan and Korea to further their studies of dance, the three choreographers, Tai Lun, Wing and Ah Lun, are back in business, finishing the final stage of rehearsal with the their troupe and heading for the national group dance competition to be held in Chengdu, Sichuan.

    It’s now less than two weeks before the competition. The troupe is rehearsal day and night for the competition. The trio are rehearsing with the dancers; at the same time, they are faced with various problems like falling behind schedule, lack of inspirations, low morale within the troupe… The pressure on them is growing day by day.
    At the same time, a lot of local troupes in the host city Chengdu are also rehearsing hard for the competition. One of them is “Hello Dance”, a champion troupe from the China competition “WORLD OF DANCE”. The troupe members often rehearse overnight. For Derek, the vice captain of the troupe, rehearsing for the competition is not much different from military training. Every troupe member has to offer 100% of their body and mind in order to attain a professional level of performance. In fact, a second-tier city as Chengdu is, the atmosphere of dancing there is never inferior to that in first-tier cities like Beijing and Shanghai. In Chengdu, dance learners can be as young as the age of seven or eight in general. The coming national competition will feature a children’s troupe which has taken part in various competitions; their eldest member is merely 15.

    The competition will take place soon. Each participating troupe is making the best out of their final 72 hours before the competition. On arrival in Chengdu from Hong Kong, Tai, Wing and Ah Lun have no room for leisure; they throw themselves in rehearsals again right away. Preparing for a competition in an unfamiliar city, however, they are faced with a series of accidents and unexpected problems. How are they going to resolve them? Will they find their way to the national stage smoothly?

    29/10/2019
  • Inroads of the Korean Pop Culture

    Inroads of the Korean Pop Culture

    South Korea with its entertainment and music industry mushrooming, has been imbibed with quality music and dancing cultures from other countries in an active manner, and it has then created its own unique genre called K-Pop which has set in motion the trend of “Korean Maniac”. Many youngsters in this generation have been indulging in adulation for Korean celebrities, dramas and dances zealously, which has moved South Korea up the echelons to become the great power of Asian creative culture.

    K-Pop is regarded as a music genre, but it is more a style of performance which integrates different dances in synergy with popular and capricious music styles, and transforms every song into dance music. Since K-Pop does not have any choreographic boundary, which resembles the choreographic style of Urban Dance that has grown popular in recent years, many choreographers have come to the fore after K-Pop has gone viral worldwide, which makes Korea a performance platform with diverse dancing styles in coexistence.

    Lun, an introvert and sentimental dancer, resolves to dabble in South Korea in order to surmount his limits and bring a more thorough performance onstage. Shrouded by this multifarious entertainment culture, he visits different dancing studios and art schools to experience the diversity of South Korean dancing techniques as well as the stories of young dancers in pursuit of their dreams through dancing.

    Will Lun be able to bring the passion of these dreamers back to Hong Kong and inspire other members of his dance regiment, so that they can complete their competition? Will Lun improve his choreographic skills through his first visit to South Korea for learning dancing?

    22/10/2019
  • Does Dancing Pay Off?

    Does Dancing Pay Off?

    Japan, a country that promotes “dance education”, began to be influenced by Western dancing as early as in the post-WWII era. Till now, numerous famous dancers have been produced in the country. In recently years, as the Education Ministry of Japan has the intention to divert the attention of children away from electronic gadgets and train up their communication skills, it promotes “dance education” on an even larger scale, and has included “urban dance”, a popular form of dance in the USA, as a compulsory component in the syllabus of Physical Education for junior high school students.

    Thanks to a broad-scale promotion on the educational level, it’s not difficult to find dancing people in the streets of Japan. Night clubs, dance studios and even outdoor squares have become the venues where young people enjoy music and dancing. Their enthusiasm for dancing has infiltrated every corner; nowadays, dance studios are never short of teenage new dancing stars who can stun you by their dancing skills.

    Wing, also a dance learner from young age, has always admired Japanese dancers for their details and sense of rhythm. She is also greatly impressed by their diligence and persistence for dancing. This time, as Wing is forming a dance troupe for a competition, she is determined to set off for Japan to train up her dancing skills and re-adjust her psychology of dancing, with a view to breaking through her own limits and seeking a great improvement in choreographic inventiveness and skills.
    Through this visit in Japan and the experience gained there, will Wing take herself and her troupe towards the international stage?

    15/10/2019
  • The Boundless Hip-Hop

    The Boundless Hip-Hop

    Los Angeles, United States is a hodgepodge of world-class performers. Numerous dancers have come to this grand stage one after another to develop their choreographic careers.

    Los Angeles is also the birthplace of Hip-Hop where many remarkable dance teachers began with Hip-Hop and gradually worked out their own choreographic styles known as Urban Dance, which is also the reason that draws Tai-lun, a dancer, to Los Angeles to learn dancing.

    Tai-lun studies with dancers from other countries in the course of his journey, and he also has the chance to learn from different elite Urban Dance dancers, in which there are members and choreographers of world-renowned dance regiments. Through attending their choreography classes, Tai-lun reflects upon his dance and styles. Tai-lun feels American aspiration for dancing as well as his own limits deeply. Although he has practiced dancing for many years, he still feels his skills are far from what he dreams of. How will Tai-lun transcend himself in the face of the distance between reality and dream? This will be his most valuable reward in this journey.

    Will learning dancing in the United States help Tai-lun improve his dancing and choreographic skills? Will he be able to help his own dance regiment which is preparing for competition after learning from his experience?

    08/10/2019
  •  Dance and Dreams

    Dance and Dreams

    Several young people are chasing their dreams under neon lights. During a rehearsal in a room of mirror walls, they ask themselves again and again: “For my dream, how far can I go?”
    It’s difficult to chase dreams, let alone to find like-minded people to do it together. Wing, Tai Lun and Ah Lun are all from different backgrounds and have different personalities, and their preferences for dance music and dance style are also all different. However, they have the same determination, which is to form a dance troupe of over twenty members to take part in a national dance competition and head for the international stage.
    The three of them decide to visit the US, Japan and Korea to throw themselves in the culture of urban dance there, in the hope that the experience there will help. They know nothing about the journey except their own determination and fervour for dancing. Will the journey stimulate their thinking and help them make their way to the international stage step by step? A story of dream chasing starts here…

    01/10/2019
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